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Today we’ll learn How US foreign policy can be systematically and rationally explained!

So the US differentiates whether the country is an existing- or non-client state

If an unacceptable government rules an existing client state, there will be covert or non-covert actions taken to replace the government

With neutral countries such as Switzerland and Austria, routine foreign administration relations are established

There are situations when existing client relations have to be abandoned because the client lost a war as in South Vietnam or a hostile regime took over as in Iran

This is the traditional US Foreign Policy where the client state receives military and economic support.

So the US differentiates whether the country is an existing- or non-client state

In the case of non-client states is quite different. If a region newly comes into the empire’s sphere of influence, the US administration will first attempt to acquire its members peacefully as the client states. This was the case, e.g., in Eastern Europe and the Baltic States after 1990.

Today we’ve learned How US foreign policy can be systematically and rationally explained!

In the case of existing client states (left side of the diagram), the empire has to decide between routine administration (B – e.g. Switzerland and Austria), military or non-military (e.g. economic) support (D to I – e.g. Colombia and Pakistan), or an attempt to replace unacceptable client governments demo­cra­tically or militarily (A – e.g. Greece 1967, Chile 1973). In certain cases, a client government can no longer hold on to power despite imperial support and must be dropped or the client state has to be abandoned altogether (C, F, G – e.g. South Vietnam 1975 or Iran 1979).

In the case of non-client states (right side of the diagram), the situation is quite different. If a region newly comes into the empire’s sphere of influence, the empire will first attempt to acquire its members peacefully as the client states (J). This was the case, e.g., in Eastern Europe and the Baltic States after 1990.