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A business story that sells is a message that effectively communicates the value proposition of a business or product to its target audience.
It’s not just about stating facts and figures, but about creating an emotional connection with the audience, making them see the value in what you’re offering, and compelling them to take action.

Telling a business story that sells involves understanding your audience, crafting a compelling meassage, and delivering it in a way that resonates with them.

Here’s how you can do this for different buyer groups:

1. **Managing Director**: The Managing Director is typically concerned with the overall strategic direction of the company.
When telling your business story to this group, focus on how your product or service aligns with their strategic goals and objectives.
Highlight how it can help them achieve their vision for the company, improve their competitive position, or drive innovation.

2. **Procurement Manager**: The Procurement Manager is primarily concerned with procurement and supply chain management.
They want to know that your product or service is reliable, cost-effective, and easy to integrate into their existing processes.
Your business story should therefore emphasize these aspects, providing concrete examples and case studies wherever possible.

3. **Finance Manager**: The Finance Manager is focused on the financial health of the company.
They want to know that investing in your product or service will yield a positive return on investment (ROI).
Your business story should therefore include clear, quantifiable evidence of the financial benefits your product or service can deliver.

4. **Operations Manager**: The Operations Manager is responsible for ensuring smooth day-to-day operations within the company.
They are interested in how your product or service can improve efficiency, reduce downtime, or streamline processes.
Your business story should therefore highlight these operational benefits.

5. **Marketing and Sales Manager**: The Marketing and Sales Manager wants to know how your product or service can help them attract more customers and increase sales.
Your business story should therefore focus on the unique selling points (USPs) of your product or service, and how it can meet the needs and desires of their target market.

6. **Human Resource Manager**: The Human Resource Manager is concerned with the welfare and development of the company’s employees.
They are interested in how your product or service can improve employee satisfaction, productivity, or skill development.
Your business story should therefore highlight these human resource benefits.

In conclusion, telling a business story that sells is all about understanding your audience and crafting a message that resonates with them. It’s about showing them how your product or service can help them achieve their goals, solve their problems, or satisfy their needs.
So get started today: identify your target audience, craft your business story, and start telling it in a way that sells.

Remember to maintain a neutral tone throughout your narrative. This helps to ensure that your message is received in the way you intended, without any bias or prejudice. Also, make sure to use clear and concise English language to make your story easy to understand and engaging for all types of audiences.